~ Yours truly ~

“Never understood the obsession with callin dude’s “whipped” for catering to your chick. Like, if you know you have someone special, there is nothing unmanly about making sure she feels that way 24/7.”
— timothy delaghetto (via desideriumxx)

(via timothydelaghetto)

“If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones.”
— Jane Espenson (from interview with Advocate.com)

(Source: fluffymoalabear, via chasingthesunrises)

micdotcom:

One comic shows what a lifetime of catcalling can do to a woman

Women have tried numerous times to explain why catcalling isn’t a compliment and why no woman wants to feel as if she’s just body parts. Ursa Eyer, a New Orleans-based artist and illustrator, is the latest woman to take on the challenge. Despite what the New York Post’s Doree Lewak recently wrote, not all of women “live to strut another day,” so Eyer has drawn a personal history of her own struggles with catcalling, highlighting the longevity of the problematic trend and how it affects women and girls of all ages.

See the final panel Follow micdotcom 

(via upworthy)

“As time goes on, you’ll understand. What lasts, lasts; what doesn’t, doesn’t. Time solves most things. And what time can’t solve, you have to solve yourself.”
— Haruki Murakami (via onlinecounsellingcollege)
folkinz:

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.
Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.


Of all the Emmy’s Breaking Bad won the other day, I am most happy that Anna Gunn won.

folkinz:

tvhangover:

How Anna Gunn’s Performance as Skyler White Changed Television.

Gunn’s performance was not that of an action heroine or a television genius, and it was not meant to be. Skyler carries the weight of Walt’s actions. Plenty of people hated her for it, Walt sometimes included. But Gunn’s performance pushed both Walt and the people who wanted to see him as a hero to increasingly contrived and ludicrous justifications for treating Skyler like she was a worse person than Walt.

Gunn’s drawn face in the last two seasons of “Breaking Bad” might not have brought about the end of the anti-hero era in television. But Gunn’s performance marked the end of a time when the creators of such shows could get away with writing anti-heroes’ wives as flat, cartoonish characters, or when audiences could get away with worshiping difficult men without encountering strong opposition.

Of all the Emmy’s Breaking Bad won the other day, I am most happy that Anna Gunn won.

(via j0nawithazero)

I’ve known a couple of my former male friends who have been toxic, emotionally draining, and immature in my life. But if there is one man I would fear, it would be a Walter White. A man with such pride and ego. A man who is critical, observant, and acts superior over you. A man who has the strength to tell you what he thinks you need to know, even if you don’t ask for it. A man who always thinks he is right. A man who is very good at reasoning. A man who is an emotional manipulator.